skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Potassium gives perovskite-based solar cells an efficiency boost

last modified Jun 07, 2018 12:05 PM
A simple potassium solution could boost the efficiency of next-generation solar cells, by enabling them to convert more sunlight into electricity

An international team of researchers led by Dr Sam Stranks at the University of Cambridge found that the addition of potassium iodide ‘healed’ the defects and immobilised ion movement, which to date have limited the efficiency of cheap perovskite solar cells. These next-generation solar cells could be used as an efficiency-boosting layer on top of existing silicon-based solar cells, or be made into stand-alone solar cells or coloured LEDs. Two Winton Scholars, Zahra Andaji-Garmaroudi and Johannes Richter were co-authors of a paper in Nature where the results have been reported.

The perovskite and potassium devices showed good stability in tests, and were 21.5% efficient at converting light into electricity, which is similar to the best perovskite-based solar cells and not far below the practical efficiency limit of silicon-based solar cells, which is (29%). Tandem cells made of two perovskite layers with ideal bandgaps have a theoretical efficiency limit of 45% and a practical limit of 35% - both of which are higher than the current practical efficiency limits for silicon. “You get more power for your money,” said Dr Sam Stranks.

Further details can be found via this link.

Winton Annual Report 2017

Winton Report 2017 cover

RSS Feed Latest news

Bartomeu Monserrat wins Psi-k Volker Heine Young Investigator Award

Jun 07, 2018

Award recognises an individual for their outstanding computational work

Potassium gives perovskite-based solar cells an efficiency boost

Jun 07, 2018

A simple potassium solution could boost the efficiency of next-generation solar cells, by enabling them to convert more sunlight into electricity

View all news