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Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability

Department of Physics

Studying at Cambridge

 

Filip Boskovic

Filip Boskovic

Winton Scholar

Supervisor: Professor Ulrich Keyser

Biological and Soft Systems Group


Biography:

I finished my undergraduate studies at the University of Belgrade in a field of molecular biology and physiology and MPhil in Physics at the University of Cambridge. I wanted to understand the details of how life works on the smallest scale. However, molecular biology was not ''so molecular'' for me and I have been working in many different labs from material science, physical chemistry, neurology, molecular genetics up to evolutionary genomics. Then I started to explore single-molecule biophysics and in Wuite group (VU Amsterdam) starts working on nanomechanics of extracellular vesicles. Further, I explored the area working on MoS2 nanopores in Radenovic group (EPFL) and in Ha group (Johns Hopkins U) working on smFRET, biological nanopores and engineered enzymes. I settled in Keyser group at the Cavendish Laboratory aiming to understand how life works at the nanoscale. I am also a member of a few societies aiming to bridge the gap between science, policymakers and industry, a keen hiker, and passionate about science promotion among youth in less develop areas. 

Research Interests

My work is devoted to deciphering the underlying details of biological mechanisms on the single-molecule level by developing and adapting the cutting-edge techniques from the physical sciences. The main research goal is the development of the whole-genome, single-molecule, single-cell mapping platform for detection structures and molecules on DNA. To do so I combine nanopores and DNA nanotechnology. With DNA nanotechnology we can design various structures and designed sites, and with nanopores, we can read what we have designed. Two biological phenomena that my research is focused on are genome folding and naturally-forming DNA secondary structures that are different than well-known DNA double helix.