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Maxwell Centre for the physical sciences

The new Maxwell Centre to be built at the Cavendish announced today by Chancellor George Osborne
Maxwell Centre for the physical sciences

Architect’s impression of the new Maxwell Centre. Credit: BPD Architects

Funding from government and business combined with that from the Winton Programme of £63m has been announced today for the creation of a new centre for the physical sciences at the Cavendish Laboratory.  “The Maxwell Centre will be the vehicle for translating ‘blue skies’ research into products of importance for the industrial sector,” said Professor Sir Richard Friend, Cavendish Professor of Physics, who will be the first Director of the Centre.

The centre will cover many aspects of fundamental physics, including advanced scientific computing, the theory of condensed matter, advanced materials and the physics of biology and medicine.   This will build upon the research from the Winton Programme and “will not be conventional research or ‘business as usual’, but a major effort to go beyond the boundaries of traditional physical science concepts”

The new building will be on the west Cambridge site and will form part of the Cavendish Laboratory’s long-term development plans, and is due to open summer 2015.  The centre will enable close interaction between researchers from Cambridge, industrial partners, as well as graduate students.   This will provide an exciting opportunity for two-way engagement between research and industry as well as preparing students for employment in high-tech industries.

David Willetts, Minister for Universities and Science, said he believes this project will “not only deliver new knowledge and applications for industry, but will accelerate growth and foster innovation between the research base and business, keeping the UK ahead in the global race.”

Further details can be found via this link.

Winton Symposium 2014

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